What’s The Future of K-Pop?

We have seen rapid growth of K-Pop in the past ten years. Based on its present status, we can forecast what will happen to K-Pop as a whole in the coming years. These will be discussed in this article.


One major question:

What would K-Pop look like ten years from now?

I also discussed this in my previous article. However, with news on the change in K-Pop industry, I decided to talk further about it in a separate article.

New groups

With new groups sprouting, and with their various debut songs, multi-fandom people like me will be confused. Which one should be followed? We will end up selecting only groups that matter.

We have witnessed various groups formed this year. These include ITZY, ONEUS, Cherry Bullet, TXT, BVNDIT, AB6IX, 1the9, TARGET, and VeriVery. These groups will be added more in the coming years. As new groups are trying to be relevant, and competing for limited attention, many will end up with less views and underrated performances.

New approaches

More stars will collaborate with non-Korean artists, like Nicki Minaj, Dua Lipa, and Lauv. But owing to lack of promotions, popularity, and music videos, these kind of music will not last for long.

With various groups catering to international audiences, and adding more English lyrics, mainstream radio stations will feature their songs. But for TV stations, only few will make it, like BTS and BLACKPINK. And only few dance crazes wil also make it.

The battle in the next years would focus more on quantity and time. The battle now would be on number of views, streams, and likes. Some existing groups are on hiatus, giving other groups chance to stand out.

With intense competition, more new songs and concepts will be featured, focusing on modern side of music, instead of traditional music used by pioneers of K-Pop. In turn, K-Pop loses its distinct flavor and might sway with mainstream trends.

The genre will expand promotions, focusing more on US and Latin America. Expect some changes if this happens, which includes assimilating Latino music into the genre.

Fans will increase. Expect more distasteful remarks between fandoms, and more support in promoting each other’s music. Sasaengs will also increase, and expect more attacks toward artists. Expect also some fandoms turning tables around, as is the case with Monbebes today.

As a whole, K-Pop might feel a gradual downturn as it battles various issues, especially that more agencies are unresponsive to these. Plus its aversion to experiment on new styles of music, as what TheBiasList pointed out. It reached the apex, and going through declining stage is becoming inevitable.

New milestones

Existing and former groups made their mark on various aspects, from album sales, concerts, and ability to penetrate Western markets. New groups will usually find it hard surpassing milestones made by pioneers, like being featured in a Time Magazine or three billion views.

We will also see more stars from new groups rise to fame. This we see today with some members of ITZY and AB6IX, who were named as one of famous Korean personalities. Even if they debuted just months ago, they immediately caught attention from more people.

More groups will disband. This is apparently the case for new groups which will only exist for a limited time (instead of usual seven years). Also, other groups under indefinite hiatus will eventually disband.

Oldies

More and more oldies will face pressing issues, like drugs, sex, and crimes, regardless if proven or not. This we see from Seungri, Daesung, and B.I, and this is not farfetched. On the other side, some oldies will do solo debuts or collab, as was the case with 2NE1’s Park Bom or Sistar’s Soyou.

More and more stars will experience depression, especially among the oldies. Take the case of Sistar’s Dasom, and even Taeyeon from Girls’ Generation. Worse, this might lead to another death like that of Sulli.

If not involved in bad stuff, more oldies will go to drama, and some will go on a date and marry. They will prefer to stick on personal life. This we see now with 2NE1’s Dara, who is now dating with her longtime crush. Even SHINee’s Minho is now thinking of having a family. Take also the words of Jin and V (Taehyung), who want to live simple lives after ten years.

Specific Forecasts

YG Entertainment, while still taking the lead in bringing K-Pop to the world, will struggle to be relevant in the music industry, as it battles various issues from its talents.

Others like SM, BigHit, JYP, and even small entertainment agencies will still remain afloat. Meanwhile, new agencies like that of Daniel Kang and PSY will start showing their own talents, competing with the big ones.  As to 1theK, we see less and less MV uploads from other agencies to the channel.

K-Pop sees Japan as a very profitable and “critical” market. In fact, July 2019 was full of comebacks in Japanese. Some groups already have Japanese members (like IZ*ONE, TWICE, and Cherry Bullet). However, the ongoing trade war and racism against Japan will indirectly cripple K-Pop in terms of sales.

Military service

All of EXO, SHINee, and Super Junior members in the camp today will finish military service, in which case they will continue their careers together.

As to BTS, all members will be in active service, at which point their fame will be on a halt until their comeback. In the meantime, TXT will take the lead.

Other talents

Produce 101 will not air anymore owing to breach of trust with fans and future trainees. This vacuum will be filled by other shows, which more or less adopt the same format. On other cases, existing groups and members will venture on different shows like Queendom, as another way of promotions.

Few soloists will stand out, like IU, Chung Ha, Heize, Park Bom, and Eric Nam. Others like Mina (AOA), Sunha (SATURDAY), and other Pristin members who left their groups will battle for fame as soloists or venture on drama.

Opening doors to non-Korean talents are giving exciting prospects to K-Pop. Expect more agencies opening its doors to them. In fact, JYP Entertainment debuted its Chinese group Boy Story, and SM Ent did the same with WayV. An agency debuted SB19, an all-Filipino group, and Zenith Media formed Z-Boys and Z-Girls.

For Z-Boys and Z-Girls, though they are quite related/non-related to K-Pop, their boom in the future will inspire other agencies to follow their concepts, shifting K-Pop to become more global in approach. This also might push agencies to add more non-Koreans to their respective groups, which will force some Koreans to tone down their racist remarks.

Final Words

In general, the challenges K-Pop will face in the coming years include (1) ability to penetrate mainstream media, (2) maintaining the vibe it has amidst globalization, (3) agencies to respond to worst of issues, (4) handling of increase in new groups, (5) keeping and maintaining talents (as is the case with IZ*ONE), (6) surpass milestones made by pioneers, and (7) need to change negative attitudes of some Koreans.

DAY6 – Sweet Chaos: MV Review

As we review tracks, we will touch on Day6 with their song Sweet Chaos. Barely four months passed since they hit it right with Time Of Our Life, and now they are releasing new track. This lead song is part of their new album The Book Of Us: Entropy.

Given enough promotions from the agency, they made steps to catch up with the rest of the groups. Would this next comeback propel them upward? Let’s see:

Storyline as whole

The title is quite defined well in the special effects pictured at the end of MV, as if imitating the black hole. There’s chaos.

Sweet Chaos was as equally exciting as Time Of Our Life. First, the striking of cymbals is very consistent. And finally, the choruses looked like the song would end by using a shift in tone. It is but normal that the immense energy is released at the final chorus, but they did it throughout all choruses.

Visuals started with monochromatic colors, but progresses on to become colorful on the second verse. Meanwhile, special effects were on them featured being gone to dust.

Review by others

TheBiasList loved the way Day6 integrated various genres in their core rock band sound. The song highlighted Dowoon’s percussion and skills of its vocalists. While the chorus did dirty by being repeated heavily, the group is more than willing to try and experiment new sounds.

KPopReviewed told that the previous lead track is difficult to beat, even if Sweet Chaos is a good follow-up song. Only the group could do punk genre, which gives beauty to the song. The rush is definitely identifiable to DAY6, which he enjoys. Only that the color was rather “cheap.”

TweetNewscaster’s Overall Rating: 84.71%
Grade: C+
Assessment: Improving

Scoreboard

Aspect   Criterion Points
Storyline 1 Storyline 5
Storyline 2 Consistent theme 5
Appearance 3 Colorful/color fits emotions 5
Appearance 4 Good taste 5
Appearance 5 No Halloween, Easter, etc. 5
Appearance 6 No astrology featured 5
Appearance 7 Less horror featured 5
Appearance 8 Not too revealing outfits 5
Music 9 Exciting/Expresses emotions 5
Music 10 Not too deafening 4
Dance 11 Learned easily even by beginners  
Dance 12 Not too sensual  
Lessons 13 Moral lesson clearly stated 3
Lessons 14 Impart something beneficial for viewers 3
Other Matters 15 Sense of humor/expresses emotions 7
Other Matters 16 Make it to mainstream media 1
Other Matters 17 Review by other sites 4
Other Matters 18 Review of MV as a whole 5
Other Matters 19    

Stray Kids (스트레이 키즈) – Double Knot: MV Review

Reviews for November releases will be continued next week.


For the second time, we will review Stray Kids, in their song Double Knot.

Their performances proved to be different from the rest of other boy groups, by providing its own sense of identity and approach. We reviewed their previous performance, where we are quite ambivalent on it due to chaotic nature of the song. This time, will they return with an outstanding performance for us? Let’s see.

(Side Note: Sad to see Woojin leaving due to personal reasons. As such, the album release will be moved a month later.)

Storyline as whole

The storyline was quite confusing. The story starts with members always running. The final story features a member picking the key to the door, which he opens.

Stray Kids made the performance less fearful as compared with Side Effects, and with that I am very pleased.

Double Knot’s special kind of EDM impressed me the most. The buzzing, looping sound is heard in most parts of the video, and the build-up of music was becoming tense at the final chorus.

Let’s look on the visuals. The settings are American, and may be mistaken for ordinary American MV if not rendered in Korean. Special effects are fully used at 1:35 – 1:38, where they made duplicates of themselves. Key symbolizes authority, and unlocking possibilities.

The concept of featuring the moon is still present at 0:07, which reminds me of Special Effects, which in turn, copies from GOT7’s Eclipse.

Review by others

KPopReviewed noted that Double Knot combines the energy of Miroh and intensity of Side Effects, yet being toned down. It also posed a different side of them being more masculine. The raps, dances, and vocals are nice. However, it held itself back on its potentials.

TheBiasList noted that this is a pre-release track, and so it being toned down is justifiable. Deep inside, it borrows concepts from Monsta X and adds every autotune available. Aside from that, it benefits from learned experiences on music experiments. Raps are arranged closer to pop than hip-hop. While this was not quite outstanding, hope this be their prelude to upcoming track.

TweetNewscaster’s Overall Rating: 85.00%
Grade: B-
Assessment: Satisfactory

Scoreboard

Aspect   Criterion Points
Storyline 1 Storyline 3
Storyline 2 Consistent theme 5
Appearance 3 Colorful/color fits emotions 5
Appearance 4 Good taste 5
Appearance 5 No Halloween, Easter, etc. 5
Appearance 6 No astrology featured 5
Appearance 7 Less horror featured 5
Appearance 8 Not too revealing outfits 5
Music 9 Exciting/Expresses emotions 5
Music 10 Not too deafening 4
Dance 11 Learned easily even by beginners 4
Dance 12 Not too sensual 5
Lessons 13 Moral lesson clearly stated 3
Lessons 14 Impart something beneficial for viewers 5
Other Matters 15 Sense of humor/expresses emotions 6
Other Matters 16 Make it to mainstream media 1
Other Matters 17 Review by other sites 4
Other Matters 18 Review of MV as a whole 5
Other Matters 19 Recalls previous songs 5
       

Criteria on Rating K-Pop Agencies and Groups (Republished)

With the recent passing of Sulli, plus other events, agencies need to respond better to various issues. Hence, this article being republished.


This time, we are going to rate K-Pop entertainment agencies and select groups. Why are we doing this? This is to recognize their hard work in promoting and caring their K-Pop artists, and to impart some things for improvement. Ultimately, an agency must be responsive and mindful of its talents. It also has to let the groups reach their fullest potential. These things will be our focus as we rate them.

(Side Note: We’ll publish this now to let the agencies prepare and respond to issues till November 30 this year, in which afterwards we will evaluate them.)

To a lesser extent, the author will tackle some financial aspects. However, this has no major effect on ratings, since generally, if agencies are responsive, fame and financial success will just follow.

How do we rate K-Pop entertainment agencies? This is based on another set of criteria, and each criterion is assigned 5 points (except for Criteria No. 5 to 7, 10 points each). In this regard, I also decided to follow that of TheBiasList, but this is an assessment of performance in another angle. They are as follows:

  1. Promotion of groups. This appraises the ability of the agency to promote its groups through fanmeetings, various comebacks, and concerts. It is important, especially that rookie groups are being formed, drowning many others in the sea of K-Pop.
  2. Rolling out of comebacks. Preferably, groups have to be given various quality comebacks, especially when many people tend to forget them and their performance. At a minimum, one comeback per group is enough. This is also anchored on the premise that “the more comebacks, the better.”

Comebacks, as defined here, exclude Japanese comebacks (as this is intended primarily for Japanese) and OSTs for K-Dramas, but include comebacks via commercials.

  1. Handling boy groups. The biases in favor of boy/girl groups over the other cannot be avoided. Hence, rating them separately helps in tracking the agency’s treatment of them.
  2. Handling girl groups. Same reason as of Criterion No. 3.
  3. Assessment as whole. The rating gives an overview of how the agency acts and performs. Assigned ten points to this to reflect how the author perceives the company as a whole. This shall be explained further when we are now ready to rate them.
  4. Longevity of groups. In general, agencies are to be responsible in keeping their groups’ permanence. Groups are ideally not to be given limited life, as is the case on some groups today. I see this also as very important, hence the greater weight assigned.
  5. Handling issues and responding to it. Greater weight is also assigned to it, as agencies need to be mindful of various issues and ways on resolving it. Otherwise, expect lower quality of performance, lesser sales, net loss, and other negative effects, plus angry/dismayed fans.
  6. Other factors. This shall be explained further in separate assessment.

But wait, there’s more! In grading the K-Pop agencies, there will be a twist:  A separate assessment for select groups will also be provided, each criterion with rating of 5 points (except for Criteria No. 4 and 5 with 10 points each). Here they are laid as follows:

  1. Health issues. This does not mean that the group must not have any health issues. Absences due solely to health issues are acceptable. But if this gravely affects the group’s performance, we have a problem.
  2. Dating issues. This also does not mean that groups are barred from dating or having a boyfriend/girlfriend. In fact, they are free to love and be loved. However, if this affects the group’s performance, we also have a problem.
  3. Other issues (Internal). This shall be further discussed, if there’s any.
  4. Attitude. Greater weight is assigned, as this focuses more on their behavior, like absenteeism, time management, handling other commitments, concern for fellow members, and quarrel between themselves. It also includes how they treat their fans, whether in Korea or overseas. Proper attitude sets the groups to right direction and fame.
  5. Attendance in concerts, meet-ups, and overseas TV shows. Greater weight is also given in this criterion. It is given that groups do have limited opportunity to hold various concerts every day. Members who are absent without justifiable reason do miss greater chances to meet, greet, and win over non-fans.
  6. Review as a whole. This shall be discussed in separate ratings.
  7. Other factors. This shall be explained further in separate assessment with them.

All agencies and groups not mentioned in various rating articles are presumed to have rating of 85.00% (B- or Satisfactory), unless otherwise stated.


Featured Image Credit: Logo of K-Pop agencies from aminoapps.com.

Criteria on Rating K-Pop Agencies and Groups

This time, we are going to rate K-Pop entertainment agencies and select groups. Why are we doing this? This is to recognize their hard work in promoting and caring their K-Pop artists, and to impart some things for improvement. Ultimately, an agency must be responsive and mindful of its talents. It also has to let the groups reach their fullest potential. These things will be our focus as we rate them.

(Side Note: We’ll publish this now to let the agencies prepare and respond to issues till November 30 this year, in which afterwards we will evaluate them.)

To a lesser extent, the author will tackle some financial aspects. However, this has no major effect on ratings, since generally, if agencies are responsive, fame and financial success will just follow.

How do we rate K-Pop entertainment agencies? This is based on another set of criteria, and each criterion is assigned 5 points (except for Criteria No. 5 to 7, 10 points each). In this regard, I also decided to follow that of TheBiasList, but this is an assessment of performance in another angle. They are as follows:

  1. Promotion of groups. This appraises the ability of the agency to promote its groups through fanmeetings, various comebacks, and concerts. It is important, especially that rookie groups are being formed, drowning many others in the sea of K-Pop.
  2. Rolling out of comebacks. Preferably, groups have to be given various quality comebacks, especially when many people tend to forget them and their performance. At a minimum, one comeback per group is enough. This is also anchored on the premise that “the more comebacks, the better.”

Comebacks, as defined here, exclude Japanese comebacks (as this is intended primarily for Japanese) and OSTs for K-Dramas, but include comebacks via commercials.

  1. Handling boy groups. The biases in favor of boy/girl groups over the other cannot be avoided. Hence, rating them separately helps in tracking the agency’s treatment of them.
  2. Handling girl groups. Same reason as of Criterion No. 3.
  3. Assessment as whole. The rating gives an overview of how the agency acts and performs. Assigned ten points to this to reflect how the author perceives the company as a whole. This shall be explained further when we are now ready to rate them.
  4. Longevity of groups. In general, agencies are to be responsible in keeping their groups’ permanence. Groups are ideally not to be given limited life, as is the case on some groups today. I see this also as very important, hence the greater weight assigned.
  5. Handling issues and responding to it. Greater weight is also assigned to it, as agencies need to be mindful of various issues and ways on resolving it. Otherwise, expect lower quality of performance, lesser sales, net loss, and other negative effects, plus angry/dismayed fans.
  6. Other factors. This shall be explained further in separate assessment.

But wait, there’s more! In grading the K-Pop agencies, there will be a twist:  A separate assessment for select groups will also be provided, each criterion with rating of 5 points (except for Criteria No. 4 and 5 with 10 points each). Here they are laid as follows:

  1. Health issues. This does not mean that the group must not have any health issues. Absences due solely to health issues are acceptable. But if this gravely affects the group’s performance, we have a problem.
  2. Dating issues. This also does not mean that groups are barred from dating or having a boyfriend/girlfriend. In fact, they are free to love and be loved. However, if this affects the group’s performance, we also have a problem.
  3. Other issues (Internal). This shall be further discussed, if there’s any.
  4. Attitude. Greater weight is assigned, as this focuses more on their behavior, like absenteeism, time management, handling other commitments, concern for fellow members, and quarrel between themselves. It also includes how they treat their fans, whether in Korea or overseas. Proper attitude sets the groups to right direction and fame.
  5. Attendance in concerts, meet-ups, and overseas TV shows. Greater weight is also given in this criterion. It is given that groups do have limited opportunity to hold various concerts every day. Members who are absent without justifiable reason do miss greater chances to meet, greet, and win over non-fans.
  6. Review as a whole. This shall be discussed in separate ratings.
  7. Other factors. This shall be explained further in separate assessment with them.

All agencies and groups not mentioned in various rating articles are presumed to have rating of 85.00% (B- or Satisfactory), unless otherwise stated.


Featured Image Credit: Logo of K-Pop agencies from aminoapps.com.

DAY6 – Time Of Our Life: MV Review

This is the first time we included DAY6 in our list of MV Reviews this year. Being the only K-Pop group so far continuing the rock vibe (aside from N.Flying), they need to be featured in this review. Let’s start!

I don’t see any moral lesson in the MV except the friendship, which is featured at the end. On something beneficial, we’ll go to the books (1:57), where they tell impliedly that we should also read these stuff.

Their performance also reminds me of CNBlue and N.Flying, which chose this kind of genre. It can be also noticed that if not going into usual tracks (like other reviewers are “complaining”), they go to rock style. This was the case during the Golden Age of K-Pop, when these were popular alongside usual songs.

The “rush” being a feature of any rock song is still present in here, and I did not find it boring. Visually, the dome, with its colors splashing, looks like one is in an actual concert. Tunes present in the group reminds me of Japanese animes, where it’s common to hear these beats in their OST. It is suggested that these kinds of music be included in Japanese tracks, if it can be done.

Also, it is suggested that JYP Entertainment give preferential attention to this band, as I see that they have more potential to become a great hit.

Review by others

TheBiasList described the song as best played for summer, and that it is best worded as “lively” among other summer songs so far. The band type approach, which defined the latter heyday of K-Pop is still present in the group, albeit in a less powerful manner.

KPopReviewed puts DAY6 in its preferred list, telling that the band has showcased its energy, which is important for them to be noticed in the sea of K-Pop. The rock tunes are enough for one to be excited and dance with their beat. They also managed to let drummers (and the drums) stand out, which is normally not the case for other songs. Finally, the settings added lights and effects, making it pleasant to see.

TweetNewscaster’s Overall Rating: 91.76%

Scoreboard

Aspect   Criterion Points
Storyline 1 Storyline  
Storyline 2 Consistent theme 5
Appearance 3 Colorful 5
Appearance 4 Good taste 5
Appearance 5 No Halloween, Easter, etc. 5
Appearance 6 No astrology featured 5
Appearance 7 Less horror featured 5
Appearance 8 Not too revealing outfits 5
Music 9 Exciting 5
Music 10 Not too deafening 5
Dance 11 Learned easily even by beginners  
Dance 12 Not too sensual  
Lessons 13 Moral lesson clearly stated 3
Lessons 14 Impart something beneficial for viewers 5
Other Matters 15 Sense of humor/expresses emotions 8
Other Matters 16 Make it to mainstream media 2
Other Matters 17 Review by other sites 5
Other Matters 18 Review of MV as a whole 5

ITZY (있지) – ICY: MV Review

ITZY is now on our list of reviews, with their song Icy.

Even if they were rookies, they proved popular in their own right. (Congratulations!) They’re still catching up by releasing Icy, and recently, named their fandom as Midzy. I won’t be surprised if fanchant now would be “ITZY Midzy spider went up the waterspout.”

Another funny thing: See if ITZY will play the MV twice: (1) as an advertisement, (2) and itself at the same time.

We have reviewed their debut song, pointing out some things to improve (which by the way, I revised the score upward). Would it be the case on their second lead song? Let’s see here:

The story describes the journey of the girls in New York. As newcomers, many are seeing them, and felt astonished with them. At that point they performed and walked with confidence, not minding what others are talking about.

They are sharing the lesson of confidence, not minding unnecessary remarks as long as you are confident on what you are. Another lesson is on value of freedom, and enjoying life. Viewers will benefit from their feature of New York City and how the people lived. They might engage viewers to travel there.

Sense of humor is seen on 0:27, where the kid shows her facial expressions. Another funny scene is at 2:46 – 2:47, and at 2:53, during a job interview.

Review by others

KPopReviewed described ITZY’s song as very energetic, expresses confidence, and “infectious”. It continuously builds suspense and energy to keep one hooked to the song. Added point was on the projection itself, harking back to TWICE’s Likey.

Weak points were on dance breaks. Even if they’re fine, they were “too awkward.” Another were expressions, which lack conviction.

TheBiasList weighed down on Icy, noting that the group performed very well in their debut song. It added that the group will stay as it establishes its genre apart with others.

Main positive factors for this song was on the girls’ charisma, noise, and energy. Pull-down factor was on vocals, which they attempted to hit high notes. It ended by telling that “frustrating elements” would not be noticed, since they are focused more on performances.

Review as whole

I find their “Blah, blah” a bit annoying. Other than that, most of the production were very good, and it can be seen that this is well-prepared and well-budgeted. I loved also how they moved the camera as if they transition from one member to the next.

Gleaning from the title itself, it might imply winter. But going further, they are playing with the words “Icy” and “I see”. Being icy contrasts their fiery nature: Spectators at first will see on them as icy, cold-hearted girls. But let them perform, and they will bring fire on the stage/streets.

On music, I appreciate the bop tone throughout the song, the blobbing tune at chorus, and the “eh-eh” remarks at the end. Opening beat shares similarities with Red Flavor of Red Velvet (at 0:05 – 0:12).

They are following the footsteps of their elder group in the latter’s song Likey. While TWICE members are going to Canada as a group, the rookie group travels independently of each other.

Another thing that stood out for me was that ITZY engages the (non-Korean) people around them. From people looking to dancers jiving with the group, the group made sure that these people are also part of the video. This adds already more excitement to the song.

TweetNewscaster’s Overall Rating: 93.00%

Scoreboard

Aspect   Criterion Points
Storyline 1 Storyline 5
Storyline 2 Consistent theme 5
Appearance 3 Colorful 5
Appearance 4 Good taste 5
Appearance 5 No Halloween, Easter, etc. 5
Appearance 6 No astrology featured 5
Appearance 7 Less horror featured 5
Appearance 8 Not too revealing outfits 5
Music 9 Exciting 4
Music 10 Not too deafening 5
Dance 11 Learned easily even by beginners 5
Dance 12 Not too sensual 5
Lessons 13 Moral lesson clearly stated 5
Lessons 14 Impart something beneficial for viewers 5
Other Matters 15 Sense of humor 6
Other Matters 16 Make it to mainstream media 3
Other Matters 17 Review by other sites 5
Other Matters 18 Review of MV as a whole 5
Other Matters 19 Shares concepts from other groups 5

GOT7 (갓세븐) – ECLIPSE: MV Review

We will now review for the first time GOT7, with their newest song Eclipse.

While we dealt with them in our previous misheard lyrics, this time we will review their first release this year. Let’s relax first on their music before we review it:


Storyline

  1. Video must have a storyline – 4 points

The video tells of different phases of the moon at chorus. It also features endless stars and breaking glass. These things imply that they are in a constant, endless state of war with love, and that they expect that it would be dark and sad.

They lacked one point, as the storyline must be clearer to understand.

  1. Theme must be consistent and clear – 5 points

The themes GOT7 consistently featured were on astronomical objects and on glasses.

Lessons

  1. Moral lesson must be clearly stated – 1 point

Pardon for the score. I don’t see any moral lesson featured here.

  1. They must impart something beneficial for their viewers – 5 points

Viewers could benefit from the knowledge shown by the boy group.

First is on learning different phases of the moon.

Second is on astronomy, where they feature stars and meteor showers.

These things might spark interest for viewers to pursue astronomy.

Other Matters

  1. Illustrates sadness in their song – 7 points

Changed this criteria to fit the song’s sad nature. As can be seen throughout the video, it was dark most of the time. This carries well their title which signifies the low point of love, or relationship.

  1. Ability of the song to make it to mainstream media – 2 points

I suppose that it would not be picked by media, due partly to their lack of popularity, and partly due to the nature of the song.

  1. Review by other sites – 3 points

KPopReviewed applauded the group for its “powerful” chorus, camera angles, and dance breaks. It was a good move when they sing the chorus. Not-so-good points include their forgettable verses and their rap which lacked greater impact. As a whole, it was their strong release for this year.

Further reading on the comments reveal that some are not impressed, for the main reason is on MV sharing some looks and concepts with other groups under JYP Ent.

TheBiasList told that GOT7 has been on the complaints list for several years. Though averse to bass, this leans closely to rock and it did not put off the song’s momentum. Added to that was the “meandering melody” that fares to almost none, common in other popular songs.

Positive notes focus on “trendy instrumentation”, and the refrain that keeps the whole song upbeat with group’s vocals.

  1. Review of the music video as a whole – 5 points

As a whole, I find it exciting, though this is a sad song by nature.

While I was not impressed on how the production played with the camera in some parts (as I felt dizzy looking on it), they nevertheless carried their performance well.

On some points, full points were given to colors as they chose colors that best describes sadness. Meanwhile, one point lacking on music was that it was quite deafening.

  1. Other factors
  • Goes back to previous songs – 5 points

This refers to 3:33, where they drew inspiration from their song Hard Carry.

  • Special effects are featured – 5 points

They made a good move featuring the moon in a different way. At 1:55 – 2:01 and 3:39 till end, it can be seen that the moon blocks the view of the sky from a member’s view.

  • Shows a bit of science – 5 points

Gravity is featured in the video, at 2:11 – 2:23, where furnitures are sliding down. This may be considered when constructing unusual houses.

  • Shares inspiration from other groups – 5 points

At 2:39 – 2:43, GOT7 might have been inspired by the hand-blindfold step from BTS in their song Blood, Sweat, and Tears. Meanwhile, the members holding with each other gets inspiration also from BTS in their song DNA.

TweetNewscaster’s Overall Rating: 86.96%